The Geoscientists to Be More Unlike and Broad

“For protection of this mother planet”

In 2019–2020, cities, nations, and continents throughout the world witnessed the hottest winter ever recorded, from Beijing, China, to Europe, to Antarctica. Decades of scientific research into how our world works demonstrates unequivocally that our climate is changing. Now, as we face the reality of the climate catastrophe, science will play a role in saving our world. However, we lack the necessary personnel to handle the most pressing scientific issues, such as how our climate is changing and when earthquakes occur. Almost 90% of geoscience PhD degrees are awarded to people from powerful western countries, while professors from east occupy less than 4% of tenured or tenure track jobs in the top 100 geoscience departments.

Giving employment or duties to the proper individuals regardless of country or race does not imply that they are stealing existing people’s positions, but rather that they are creating more room for the existence of surviving individuals. Because of this lack of diversity, we are missing people who could assist us in finding answers. It implies that we may not be taking into account all individuals and communities while looking for methods to adapt to our changing world, save lives, and cope with costly natural disasters.

Science, like any other human effort, benefits from diversity and inclusion. Scientists are needed to understand and collaborate with the vulnerable populations that will be most impacted by rising temperatures, greater flooding, larger wildfires, stronger hurricanes, and deadly earthquakes. Just as we will all need to work together to mitigate the worst effects of a conflict, we all need to act to ensure geoscience truly represents and includes everyone. Other sectors are rapidly recognizing the critical significance of collaborating with geoscientists to make their goods more sustainable and ethical, from product creation to product retirement. Diversity in the fashion and real estate sectors implies that we must all work together to produce genuine, practical solutions. However, if we exclusively deal with homogeneous groups, the solutions created may only target a tiny section of the globe or may accidentally hurt others.

Here one thing should be noted that at present china is the only country that is creating lot of opportunities for the best people around the world especially in the field of Geosciences. For example Chinese geophysical society provides equal opportunities for all nations to represent their work; National science foundation of china (NSFC) is most beneficial funding project for young scientists exclusive of nationality or any race. Gender diversity in the geosciences has improved, but nearly 20 years later, there is still a gender gap in Earth and space science, and historically underrepresented ethnic and cultural minorities in the United States, people from developing countries, and people with disabilities are less likely to be included in the geoscience community. We have not (yet) erased the obstacles that existed decades ago, and Indiana Jones and other clichés of geoscientists remain our default images.

We also understand that more needs to be done and that transforming the workforce in Earth and space research will take time. We strongly encourage everyone to work together to change the geoscience community. Now is the moment to make a fresh commitment to building a community that reflects and serves everyone. It is critical to the survival of our planet.

Author:

Dr. Ibrar Iqbal

College of Geosciences

Guilin University Of Technology

Guilin, Guanxi China.

Disclaimer

The opinions expressed in our published works are those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions of Asian Science Letters or its Editors. Information contained in our published works have been obtained by Asian Science Letters from authors believed to be reliable in their field.

Follow us,

https://www.facebook.com/asianscienceletters

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: